Leader Spotlight

Washington, D.C.—Human Rights First today welcomed Bishop Garrison as its next director of National Security Outreach and of Veterans for American Ideals. Garrison, who is an Army veteran and West Point graduate, recently served as interim executive director of the Truman National Security Project.

Read More...

Our Leader Spotlights offer a glimpse into our diverse leadership: veterans who are continuing to serve their country and community in creative ways. Today, we profiled Teresa Kennedy, a 2016 distinguished graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and a 2015 Harry S. Truman Scholar. She currently lives and works in Washington DC as a defense consultant.  

Tell me about your military service.  

Read More...

Vets for American Ideals' Leader Spotlight series highlights our diverse and dynamic veteran leaders. Today, we hear from Sharon Robino-West of Omaha, Nebraska.

Tell me about your military service.

Read More...

I hope to remind every veteran they have so much value and worth, and that we can continue our mission by uniting, leading, and serving our communities. If not for us, and the inherent pride it brings, then for the future generations. Our children deserve the best we can give them; a solid foundation of character, knowledge, and freedom.  

Read More...

As someone who came to America as a young man, I want immigrants who come to this country to have the support and opportunity I had when I arrived from Ireland. The local allies who supported our military in Iraq and Afghanistan—who received visas under the Special Immigrant Visa program—don’t have the same networks to leverage. In Boston, I’m building long-term relationships with our wartime allies and refugees from other countries in the hopes of accelerating and easing their transition into America.

Read More...

After twenty-six years on active duty, Steve could have easily retired into satisfaction, hanging his hat on an impressive career of service to this nation. But he felt a calling to continue serving the ideals that he defended in uniform—freedom, generosity, and dignity for all.

So, Steve and his wife Diane began a new mission: welcoming the world’s most vulnerable.

Read More...

During our service, we often followed the person with the loudest voice, or we were that voice, giving orders and staging the charge. Now, as a veteran, when I raise my voice, others listen. Veterans are given a platform in our society, so I intend to use it to for the better of my community. It’s my hope that by speaking out, that others will join me in my charge.

Read More...

As a veteran, I feel that our service never stops. Our country gave us so much and it is incumbent upon veterans to give back to our country and to our communities. The United States is hungry for positive leadership and veterans can provide the leadership our country needs at the local, state, and national levels.

Being a veteran in the current “thank you for your service” culture amplifies our voices. People listen. People want to hear our stories. People know that we have been deployed and fought through difficult circumstances. As a result, we have a responsibility not only to continue our service in whatever way we are called, but also to speak up and to speak out for the issues that need our voices.

Read More...

We have to recognize that there’s great power bestowed in the tremendous respect America has for its military and veteran community. It’s our responsibility to use that power to build bridges. I live in a hamlet in upstate New York, where I have the opportunity to become friendly with people whom I would never have the opportunity to interact with otherwise because I’m a veteran. I also think it’s critically important to speak up because if we don’t, people will put words in our mouth or speak behind our backs. We fought to protect our right to free speech, guaranteed by the Constitution, and should exercise those rights.

Read More...

My time in the Marine Corps showed me that service comes in many forms. As a veteran I often hear “thank you for your service,” meaning my service to my country. As I look back, however, I think my service was more to my fellow Marines. Where I really made an impact, and where I felt I was the most useful, was when I was helping, teaching, and mentoring other Marines—and that’s something I can do out of uniform. Service isn’t just about wearing cammies or deploying overseas, service is about helping the people around you.

Read More...